Archive

 
 
19554727_1184668851679105_6102910503337324614_n.jpg

Workshop: Show Me The Money with Paula Carjack

Led by Paula Varjack, this workshop will use performance, writing and interview, to explore the ways in which artists support themselves through their artistic work, and through other means. Participants will be encouraged to share problems and solutions related to presentation, funding, financial precariousness, and transparency. Open to artists of all disciplines and levels of experience.

Paula Varjack is a writer, filmmaker and theatre maker. Her work explores identity, the unsaid, and making the invisible visible. She makes work across disciplines; performance, theatre, documentary and spoken word. Her most recent show “ Show Me The Money” - explores the reality of making a living as an artist in the U.K., based on interviews with artists across the country. Born in Washington D.C. to a Ghanaian mother and a British father, out of they many places she has lived she considers east London to be "home".

 
Changing the World Through the Arts-19 (1).JPG

Panel Discussion: Changing the World Through the Arts

This panel discussion event explores how the arts can be used to facilitate societal and environmental change. What does innovation look like in creative, socially-driven practices? In looking to the future, do we as artists and practitioners have a responsibility to consider social impact? Is change a critical factor when thinking about the sustainability of the creative industries? How do we ensure our sector thrives amidst governmental changes that put us under threat? What barriers are you encountering in your own artistic practice?

This discussion includes insights from artists, producers and designers, including Amy Martin, Carl Sealeaf, Ellie Harrison, Daniel Blyden and Chris Sadler

 
MAIA Creatives Arts Project Birmingham Event Workshop Artist Talk Leah Gordon.jpg

Talk: Kanaval - Vodou, Politics and Revolution on the Streets of Haiti; Leah Gordon

Artist Leah Gordon reflects on her exhibition 'Kanaval' at Ort Gallery. Gordon documents the pre-Lenten Mardi Gras Festivities in Jacmel, a coastal town in Southern Haiti. Her photographs register Haiti’s juncture between its history, its cosmology and the present. Gordon’s images document troupes of ‘performers’ acting out mythological and political tales in a whorish theatre of the absurd that course the streets unshackled by traditional parade. Light years away from the sanitised corporate-sponsored tourist parades of carnival throughout the world, the images reveal an event that is a potent vessel for transmitting, telling, retelling and reinterpreting Haitian history.

Leah Gordon is a multi-media artist who curates, collects, researches, writes, educates and directs. She works across a variety of media including photography, film and installations, often including commissioned sculpture and painting.